rv insurance

Your Guide to The Fundamentals of Recreational Vehicle Insurance

When it comes to hitting the open rode, and bringing the comforts of home while you explore the highways and byways of American, there’s nothing better than an RV. Whether your trip will take you 15 miles or 1,500 miles, your RV is your ticket to seeing all of the places you’ve always dreamed of going, and bringing the comforts of home with you, all the while. But as with any other type of vehicle, you need to take steps to protect yourself. Natural disasters, collisions with wildlife, wear and tear, an accident with another vehicle – these are all risks having an RV entails.

With so much potential for disaster to strike, you need RV insurance to protect both your family and your investment. But with a multitude of insurance agencies, and different types of policies available, how can you ensure that you’re getting the right policy that will keep you and your family safe? Read ahead to discover the fundamentals of RV insurance, and learn about the critical areas you need to know before you make a decision.

What is RV Insurance?

RV insurance is a policy,  provided by an insurance provider to a consumer, that protects their trailer, camper or motorhome by agreeing to pay out in the event of damage or loss. Different policies offer different types of coverage, dependent on the RV owner’s needs and desires, to safeguard a vehicle, and provide peace of mind during vacations and long drives.

If you drive an RV, you will have to obtain liability coverage, since both federal and state laws require you to have vehicle insurance to drive legally. In almost every circumstance, any kind of motorhome, any RV that is still under loan, and any rental RVs, will require insurance. In certain states, you may not be required to get RV insurance if your RV is tow-only, and you completely own the vehicle (i.e. have paid off your loan).

What Does RV Insurance Cover?

Insurance for RVs cover some of the similar risks that car insurance provides, such as collision coverage, liability coverage, and extended coverage. You will also be provided with additional security for your private possessions on board, equipment, and other accessories installed in the RV, such as a satellite dish or canopy. Depending on your how much risk you’re willing to assume, you can opt for additional coverage, including overall replacement, emergency expenses, and vacation coverage.

How Does Insurance For RVs Work?

Insurance for your RV will safeguards you as an RV owner from extensive costs in the event of a loss or damage, even if you are the one to blame in an accident which causes injury or damage to property. It can also give coverage for your expenses if your RV ever breaks down on the road. Below are some problems you could encounter during an RV vacation, and how an RV insurance would possibly cover it:

  • If you have uninsured/under-insured motorist coverage, and another car crashes into you, but that driver is not insured, your insurance provider will pay for full/partial damages depending on the company’s terms. The amount you will receive will also depend on how critical the damage is, your deductible amount, and the restrictions of your policy.

  • If you caused the accident, the other driver must file a claim with your insurance provider. Your insurance provider will pay the claim with the amount, depending on the terms your policy outlines for your liability coverage. You will have to pay for any damage expenses, injuries and other fees incurred beyond the limits arranged on your insurance policy.

  • If your RV is non-functional after the accident, and will have to be towed, your insurance policy will cover all or some of the expenses of towing.

  • If your RV is stolen, an animal caused damage to it, or is damaged by natural phenomenon, your extended coverage should pay for some or all of your losses, depending on the limits you have chosen in your insurance.

Is RV Insurance Important?

Like automobile insurance, RV insurance is mandatory in all states in the United States. All states also demand a minimum amount of insurance coverage to be able to legally operate a motor vehicle. In some states, they also require getting uninsured and under-insured motorists insurance. Once the minimum amounts of coverage have been set, you will determine the amount of additional coverage you want, and in what areas.

Be sure to determine how you will handle expenses if you get involved in an accident, and do not have sufficient coverage. You will be obligated for additional requirements if you’re renting the RV, if you live permanently inside your RV, or if you borrowed funds to purchase your RV.

What Coverages are Offered?

Collision Coverage

This will help you pay for any repairs or replacements needed for your RV, if it has been damaged because of an accident with another car or an object. Collision coverage may also cover the physical structure of the RV, and the features attached inside, such as sinks and installed TVs.

Extended Coverage

Damages to your RV can also be caused by other factors aside from a collision. Extensive coverage will help cover the expenses of repairing your RV if it is damaged by natural disasters. For instance, extensive coverage will help cover damages caused by floods. Read the terms of your insurance policy, or contact your agent to know what is covered in your insurance.

Medical Coverage

This helps cover medical bills or funeral expenses that you or anyone on your RV incurs as the result of an accident up to the limitations of your policy.

Contents Coverage

You may have noticed that your RV insurance also offers restricted coverage for all your personal possessions. Read your insurance policy to know about content coverage it provides. If you have homeowners insurance, the personal property coverage on that policy will also help cover your property while it is being stored inside your RV.

full coverage insurance

Full Coverage Insurance: What does it mean?

You’ve probably heard the term “full coverage auto insurance”. If you have financed a vehicle, the finance company will require you to have full coverage insurance. What exactly does that mean? You may be surprised to hear that there isn’t exactly a full coverage policy. Full coverage is a combination of solid protection coverage for you and your vehicle. When you tell your insurance agent that you need full coverage, there are a few things that they will put together for you. Let’s take a look at what it all means.

 

Your state requires that you have a minimum of liability coverage. This is to protect both parties. The two types of liability coverage are bodily injury and property damage.

 

Bodily injury will covers medical expenses for another person, if you cause the accident. This will also protect you, if you are sued.

 

Property damage covers damage to someone else’s property, if you cause the accident. This coverage takes care of another vehicle if you cause the accident. This does not cover your vehicle, collision covers that.  

 

Some states require uninsured or underinsured coverage which covers cover your medical expenses. Medical payment coverage and personal injury coverage covers yours and your passengers medical payments up to the maximum limit.

 

Collision coverage is required, by the finance company, if you have financed your vehicle. Why? Because this is what covers your vehicle if damaged. This coverage pays for repair or replacement. Again, there are limitations.

 

Comprehensive is another type of coverage that finance companies require. Imagine a deer jumps in front of your vehicle and you hit it. There isn’t anyone else in that situation that can pay for the expenses, except for you and your insurance company. Damage from hitting a deer can be expensive. You comprehensive insurance will cover this. Also, under this coverage is vandalism, theft, and weather related damage, like hail.

 

Rental vehicle reimbursement pays up to a limit per day, for you to have a rental vehicle, while your vehicle is being repaired or replaced.

 

Having coverage does not mean that your insurance company will cover all of the cost associated with the accident. There are maximum limits that your insurance will cover. This is important to speak with your insurance agent to go over what your maximum limits are. Remember, your state requires minimum coverage, you may want to increase that coverage.

 

These have deductible which you have to pay. Common deductible are $500 or $1000, meaning you pay that portion and the insurance company pays the rest, based on the limits of your policy.

 

Speak to your agent about what type of coverage you can have with your budget. You may be able to play around with the deductible to get the coverage you want with the budget that you have.

car

Four Questions to Ask Yourself When Deciding to Repair or Replace Your Windshield

There’s a sound that occurs when a rock or pebble hits your windshield that is unique among most sounds. Most people, if they were asked to close their eyes and listen, would be able to pick out the sound easily. It’s a mix of a smack, whack, and splintery sound that makes anyone cringe. We all know it’s going to need to be either repaired or replaced. This can extend to your entire car and location. My friend recently got some great advice about his window screen from auto repair Roanoke. To help you decide, here are four questions to ask yourself as you consider whether to repair or replace your cracked windshield.

How deep is the damage?

Modern windshields are made of two layers of tempered glass with a plastic resin sandwiched between them. Auto glass manufacturers developed this type of glass specifically for the front windshield of cars. The side windows are made of tempered glass that is thicker and will shatter into a thousand glittering pieces when hit with something hard. This is not the case with household window glass. It is made of strong, clear glass that breaks into long slivers and could easily skewer an adult or child. Neither of these types of glass will last long at the front of your vehicle while you are driving at speed. Even tiny pebbles would create instant havoc to the front driver and passenger.

Because of this three layered construction, the damage can be shallow and barely dent the first layer of tempered glass. It can be slightly deeper and go into the plastic resin middle layer. Or it can go completely through all three layers leaving a whistling hole in your windshield.

If the crack is only through to the first or second layer, it’s likely you can repair it yourself or have it repaired. If it’s the final case and you can push a toothpick through to the inside and feel it’s poke on your finger, then you’ll likely want to have an auto glass repair guru go through it to see if it needs to be repaired or replaced. Most likely it will require replacement.

How close is the crack to the edge of the frame?

Cracks that touch the windshield frame or that are within a few inches of it are not very good candidates for repair. Todays auto manufacturers have engineered the windshield to be part of the structure that keeps the roof from collapsing when the car is in a rollover accident. Cracks that touch the frame are extremely difficult to repair and are unlikely to stay repaired. This is also true for those close the edge. This type of damage directly affects the integrity of the frame support and could cause a roof to collapse onto the passengers inside, severely hurting them or worse, killing someone. The risk is too high to take. It’s best to just have the windshield replaced.

How big is the chip or crack?

Most cracks less than an inch and a half in diameter and only exposing the plastic resin can be easily fixed with a home windshield repair kit. These are easy to do and normally take only a half a day to accomplish. You can find them online at Amazon.com or you can go to your local Walmart or Sears for a kit. You can also purchase them at Autozone or another auto parts store in your area.

Your local auto repair shops can also easily repair damaged windshields up to three inches in diameter. If the damage is larger than that, most auto repair shops will tell you to replace your windshield. There are some specialty repair shops who are willing to repair a crack up to 12 inches long, but they are quite expensive and it might be more cost effective to have it replaced.

What does my insurance cover?

Most insurances today are required to cover repairs of small cracks done by an auto repair shop and you won’t have to pay anything. However, there is legislature in Arizona being backed by some insurance companies to remove that requirement. So things could drastically change in the near future. Especially if the insurance companies are successful in their lobbying to have the requirement removed. So check with your insurance to see what they cover, how much it will cost you, and if you have a say in who repairs or replaces your windshield. Some insurance companies have specific requirements regarding whether to repair or replace a windshield, so you’ll want to know ahead of time what they are so you’re not incurring costs you don’t need to.

 

Deciding whether to repair or replace a windshield is an important decision for the safety of yourself, your family, and those who ride with you. Don’t wait to decide what to do because the longer you wait, the more chance the damage will spread. Using your windshield wipers, having the sun beat down on the crack, or allowing water to stay and freeze in the crack are just a few ways the crack can continue to grow, so decide quickly then act just as quickly to repair the damage so you can go back to smiling through your clean clear front windshield.

Car Insurance Premiums Vary For a Wide Variety of Reasons

Choosing a vehicle isn’t just about the look or speed. You may find a beautiful vehicle that is fast and is perfect for you, until you check with your insurance company. Yikes! The premium could be a deal breaker.

 

Car Insurance premiums widely vary between vehicles. There are many factors that come into play when determining the premium both personally and for the vehicle.

 

Personal factors include:

  • AGE
  • SEX
  • MARTIAL SATAUS
  • CREDIT HISTORY
  • WHERE YOU LIVE
  • DRIVING RECORD

 

For the vehicle

  • SAFETY TESTS
  • ACCIDENT RATES
  • LIKELIHOOD OF THEFT
  • COST OF REPAIRS
  • THE ENGINE SIZE

 

 

Luckily, we’ve chosen the top five cars with the cheapest premiums among the most popular vehicles and the most expensive.

 

BONUS: Check the bottom for the best brand for insurance premiums.

 

 

Vehicles with the lowest premiums

 

Honda Odyssey LX

Annual Insurance Premium: $1112

 

Jeep Renegade Sport

Average Annual Insurance Premium: $1,138

 

Jeep Wrangler Black Bear Average

Annual Insurance Premium: $1,148

 

Honda CR-V SUV

Average Annual Insurance Premium: $1170

 

Jeep Compass

Average Annual Insurance Premium: $1183

 

 

Vehicles with the highest premiums

 

Mercedes S65 AMG (Convertible)

Annual Insurance Premium: $3835

 

Dodge GTS Viper

Annual Insurance Premium: $3779

 

Mercedes S63 AMG 4Matic (Convertible)

Annual Insurance Premium: $3624

 

Maserati Quattroporte GTS

Annual Insurance Premium: $3547

 

Mercedes S550 (Convertible)

Annual Insurance Premium: $3502

 

Every insurance policy is going to be different. There are different rates and coverage with different deductibles. Before purchasing a new vehicle, speak with your insurance agent about what type of vehicle would work best for you. Your personal details, including what coverage and deducible you can afford, should be discussed with your agent. Save yourself the heartache of finding a vehicle you love, only to learn you can’t afford it plus the insurance.

 

When you are shopping for vehicles be sure to ask about its safety rating and safety features. Some vehicles will have back-up cameras, rear cross traffic alerts, lane departure alerts, and blind spot monitoring. These features may help your insurance rates, but are really useful while you’re driving.

 

BONUS:

The best brand for lowest insurance premium goes to JEEP. Jeep has several vehicles that consistently have lower premiums. The Jeep Wrangler SUV, Jeep Patriot, Jeep Cherokee, Jeep Compass, and Jeep Renegade have some of the best insurance rates.

Does Insurance Cover Windshield Repair?

It promises to be a sunny, pleasant day as you and your family are cruising down the road. Suddenly, a large truck passes by and produces tiny rocks in its wake. You hope for the best but unfortunately, a small stone finds your windshield and produces a ding. It’s only a little star-shaped spot, but you know that it could start spreading at any moment causing need of a full out windshield replacement.

There are two ways to go about attending to the ding. You can repair it yourself, which will fix it for a little while but might require replacement later, or you could go ahead and get it replaced. The good news is that most insurance policies cover this sort of damage, but let’s look into your options and examine the possibilities.

 

Repairs Before Insurance

According to the NWRA, National Windshield Repair Association, replacing a windshield is much more expensive than repairing one. They suggest that any repairs should be carried out as soon as possible to prevent any further cracks or the damage becoming worse. A general rule to help your decision is that a chip or crack smaller than a dollar bill can generally be repaired.

Find a magnifying glass and take a good look at the damage. To fix this little problem, a neat technique is to inject acrylic adhesive or epoxy into the crack. You can purchase a repair kit for around $10 to save your windshield, at least for a while. Walmart and other big department stores carry these sort of items, as do autoparts places like Autozone.

Unavoidably, your window might need to be replaced, but at least you’ll have time to save a bit of money before diving into the process of  windshield replacement.

 

Insurance Help

No need to fear however, if you aren’t able to patch up the ding. Your insurance policy may be able to help with any repairs needed. Comprehensive or full glass coverage options are available to protect you against the cost of fixing or replacing a windshield.

Comprehensive coverage assists you in repairing or replacing your vehicle if it’s stolen or damaged in an accident that’s not a collision. This can include fires, vandalism, or falling objects like trees or hail. If you are leasing or financing your car, your lender most likely requires comprehensive coverage. If you own your vehicle, this coverage is an optional addition to your car insurance policy.

Full glass coverage is available in some states as part of, or addition to, your comprehensive coverage. With this option, you may not have to pay a deductible for any repair done to your windshield. Talk with your local insurance agent to get more details about your specific coverage choices.

 

Determining Deductibles

The amount of money that you would pay out-of-pocket before your insurance starts helping pay for the claim is the deductible. Whether you pay for a damaged windshield claim or not depends on your own policy and where you live. Keep in mind that usually a car insurance policy will only cover the amount of a claim that exceeds the deductible.

For example, say you have a deductible of $500 on your comprehensive coverage. If you make a glass claim to get your cracked windshield repaired but it only costs $198, you’d end up paying entirely out-of-pocket. But don’t worry, there are some situations that could relieve you from paying a deductible on a glass claim.

  • If your comprehensive coverage includes a glass repair agreement, then depending on your policy, your insurance company won’t apply the deductible if the windshield only needs repairs and not replacement.
  • If you’ve chosen full glass coverage, then it will pay for the repair of a windshield with no deductible.
  • Some states do not apply deductibles to comprehensive claims on windshield damages, so check out your state’s regulations on auto insurance claims.  

All in all, repairing the damage yourself is the best route to go, but if you need replacement, it’s always best to check out what sort of insurance coverage you have. Looking into it now can help any future accidents as well.

Windshield damage can’t always be prevented, but having the proper automotive coverage in place may help you get repairs made so you can get back on the road.

How to Avoid a Rear-End Collision

Rear end collisions are the most frequent type of collision. Because of property damage and medical expenses, they can be quite expensive. Who is liable for a rear-end collision? Typically, the driver that rear-ended the vehicle is to blame for a rear end collision.

What can you do to avoid being rear-ended or rear-ending another vehicle?

  1. Inspect your vehicle to ensure all lights are working. Broken taillight, break lights, or blinker lights could cause a rear-end collision because the driver of the vehicle behind you may not know your intentions until it’s too late. Rear lights give the driver behind you time to react to your next move.
  1. Do not text or any other activity that is distracting to the driver. That includes looking at passengers while driving. If you drop something, like a drink, do not reach over to find and pick up the drink. Use your blinker and slowly drive your vehicle to the shoulder of the road before picking any object up.
  1. Be aware of your surroundings. First, check the visibility conditions before you start your vehicle. During dense fog leave extra room, so that you have time to react to the driver ahead of you. Rain and snow can be very hazardous. Those road conditions can leave drivers somewhat helpless at times. You may be aware that the vehicle in front of you is stopping, but your vehicle may slide into them anyway. Give yourself extra room during slippery conditions.
  1. Be cautious of your surroundings. While driving down a busy street, leave extra space between you and the vehicle in front of you. If a person or animal runs in front of their vehicle they may not have very much warning time either. While driving near schools, parks, veterinary offices, and dog parks be aware of children or animals that could run in front of you or the driver ahead of you.
  1. Know your medications. Many medications, both over the counter and prescriptions, cause drowsiness. Drowsiness can impair reaction time.
  1. Drive the appropriate speed. The speed limit is set based off of road conditions and risks. Neighborhoods and curvy roads will have a lower speed limit, while highways will have a much higher limit.
  1. Avoid tailgaters or tailgating other vehicles. If you notice a vehicle that is following too closely, pull to the shoulder and allow them to pass. If they are too close, they may not have enough time to react to your vehicle turning or slowing to a stop sign. To avoid tailgating another vehicle try the 3 second rule. This rule of thumb will give you enough space to react to the vehicle
  1. Larger vehicle, larger following distance. If you can’t see in front or around the larger vehicle leave extra space between both vehicles. This will allow increased reaction time.
  1. Many vehicles that stop frequently will have a sign or lights giving you notice that they will stop many times. Look for these vehicles and adjust your speed and distance accordingly
  1. Have a safe exit route. Sometimes the only way for you to avoid rear-ending another vehicle is to pull to the shoulder. There may not always be a safe place to go to, but many times there will be a shoulder to drive to.

Rear-end collisions are one of the most frequent collisions and can usually be avoided. Knowing a rear end collision lawyer Vancouver can come in handy if the worst were to happen. Being aware of your situation and using the appropriate speed and distance can help you avoid this. Not only will these tips help you from rear-ending another vehicle, but these can help you from being rear-ended. In the event that this happens, having vehicle insurance is important and can save you thousands of dollars, not to mention a ticket for not being insured.