Does Insurance Cover Windshield Repair?

It promises to be a sunny, pleasant day as you and your family are cruising down the road. Suddenly, a large truck passes by and produces tiny rocks in its wake. You hope for the best but unfortunately, a small stone finds your windshield and produces a ding. It’s only a little star-shaped spot, but you know that it could start spreading at any moment causing need of a full out windshield replacement.

There are two ways to go about attending to the ding. You can repair it yourself, which will fix it for a little while but might require replacement later, or you could go ahead and get it replaced. The good news is that most insurance policies cover this sort of damage, but let’s look into your options and examine the possibilities.

 

Repairs Before Insurance

According to the NWRA, National Windshield Repair Association, replacing a windshield is much more expensive than repairing one. They suggest that any repairs should be carried out as soon as possible to prevent any further cracks or the damage becoming worse. A general rule to help your decision is that a chip or crack smaller than a dollar bill can generally be repaired.

Find a magnifying glass and take a good look at the damage. To fix this little problem, a neat technique is to inject acrylic adhesive or epoxy into the crack. You can purchase a repair kit for around $10 to save your windshield, at least for a while. Walmart and other big department stores carry these sort of items, as do autoparts places like Autozone.

Unavoidably, your window might need to be replaced, but at least you’ll have time to save a bit of money before diving into the process of  windshield replacement.

 

Insurance Help

No need to fear however, if you aren’t able to patch up the ding. Your insurance policy may be able to help with any repairs needed. Comprehensive or full glass coverage options are available to protect you against the cost of fixing or replacing a windshield.

Comprehensive coverage assists you in repairing or replacing your vehicle if it’s stolen or damaged in an accident that’s not a collision. This can include fires, vandalism, or falling objects like trees or hail. If you are leasing or financing your car, your lender most likely requires comprehensive coverage. If you own your vehicle, this coverage is an optional addition to your car insurance policy.

Full glass coverage is available in some states as part of, or addition to, your comprehensive coverage. With this option, you may not have to pay a deductible for any repair done to your windshield. Talk with your local insurance agent to get more details about your specific coverage choices.

 

Determining Deductibles

The amount of money that you would pay out-of-pocket before your insurance starts helping pay for the claim is the deductible. Whether you pay for a damaged windshield claim or not depends on your own policy and where you live. Keep in mind that usually a car insurance policy will only cover the amount of a claim that exceeds the deductible.

For example, say you have a deductible of $500 on your comprehensive coverage. If you make a glass claim to get your cracked windshield repaired but it only costs $198, you’d end up paying entirely out-of-pocket. But don’t worry, there are some situations that could relieve you from paying a deductible on a glass claim.

  • If your comprehensive coverage includes a glass repair agreement, then depending on your policy, your insurance company won’t apply the deductible if the windshield only needs repairs and not replacement.
  • If you’ve chosen full glass coverage, then it will pay for the repair of a windshield with no deductible.
  • Some states do not apply deductibles to comprehensive claims on windshield damages, so check out your state’s regulations on auto insurance claims.  

All in all, repairing the damage yourself is the best route to go, but if you need replacement, it’s always best to check out what sort of insurance coverage you have. Looking into it now can help any future accidents as well.

Windshield damage can’t always be prevented, but having the proper automotive coverage in place may help you get repairs made so you can get back on the road.

How to Avoid a Rear-End Collision

Rear end collisions are the most frequent type of collision. Because of property damage and medical expenses, they can be quite expensive. Who is liable for a rear-end collision? Typically, the driver that rear-ended the vehicle.

 

What can you do to avoid being rear-ended or rear-ending another vehicle?

 

  1. Inspect your vehicle to ensure all lights are working. Broken taillight, break lights, or blinker lights could cause a rear-end collision because the driver of the vehicle behind you may not know your intentions until it’s too late. Rear lights give the driver behind you time to react to your next move.

 

  1. Do not text or any other activity that is distracting to the driver. That includes looking at passengers while driving. If you drop something, like a drink, do not reach over to find and pick up the drink. Use your blinker and slowly drive your vehicle to the shoulder of the road before picking any object up.

 

  1. Be aware of your surroundings. First, check the visibility conditions before you start your vehicle. During dense fog leave extra room, so that you have time to react to the driver ahead of you. Rain and snow can be very hazardous. Those road conditions can leave drivers somewhat helpless at times. You may be aware that the vehicle in front of you is stopping, but your vehicle may slide into them anyway. Give yourself extra room during slippery conditions.

 

  1. Be cautious of your surroundings. While driving down a busy street, leave extra space between you and the vehicle in front of you. If a person or animal runs in front of their vehicle they may not have very much warning time either. While driving near schools, parks, veterinary offices, and dog parks be aware of children or animals that could run in front of you or the driver ahead of you.

 

  1. Know your medications. Many medications, both over the counter and prescriptions, cause drowsiness. Drowsiness can impair reaction time.

 

  1. Drive the appropriate speed. The speed limit is set based off of road conditions and risks. Neighborhoods and curvy roads will have a lower speed limit, while highways will have a much higher limit.

 

  1. Avoid tailgaters or tailgating other vehicles. If you notice a vehicle that is following too closely, pull to the shoulder and allow them to pass. If they are too close, they may not have enough time to react to your vehicle turning or slowing to a stop sign. To avoid tailgating another vehicle try the 3 second rule. This rule of thumb will give you enough space to react to the vehicle

 

  1. Larger vehicle, larger following distance. If you can’t see in front or around the larger vehicle leave extra space between both vehicles. This will allow increased reaction time.

 

  1. Many vehicles that stop frequently will have a sign or lights giving you notice that they will stop many times. Look for these vehicles and adjust your speed and distance accordingly

 

  1. Have a safe exit route. Sometimes the only way for you to avoid rear-ending another vehicle is to pull to the shoulder. There may not always be a safe place to go to, but many times there will be a shoulder to drive to.

 

Rear-end collisions are one of the most frequent collisions and can usually be avoided. Being aware of your situation and using the appropriate speed and distance can help you avoid this. Not only will these tips help you from rear-ending another vehicle, but these can help you from being rear-ended.  In the event that this happens, having vehicle insurance is important and can save you thousands of dollars, not to mention a ticket for not being insured.